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Should prosthetics be allowed in the 2012 Olympics?

 

Why Oscar Pistorius deserves to run

By Ford Vox, Special to CNN

August 29, 2011 — Updated 0925 GMT (1725 HKT)

Oscar Pistorius wins the T44 100m event during the BT Paralympics World Cup Athletics on May 27 in Manchester, England.

Oscar Pistorius wins the T44 100m event during the BT Paralympics World Cup Athletics on May 27 in Manchester, England.

STORY HIGHLIGHTS

  • Runner Oscar Pistorius, a double amputee, is competing for a spot in the 2012 Olympics
  • Ford Vox: Some argue he should be excluded because of his carbon-fiber prosthetics
  • He says other athletes have and can gain all kinds of unfair advantages
  • Conquering your disability with technology is a plus, not a minus, Vox says

Editor’s note: Dr. Ford Vox is a medical writer and neuro-rehabilitation physician. He is the medical director of Brain Injury Rehabilitation at New England Rehabilitation Hospital and clinical assistant professor of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at Tufts University School of Medicine.

Boston (CNN) — A man born without functioning legs ran the 400 meters in 45.07 seconds on July 19, 2011, the fastest time recorded by an amputee. The ripple effects of this historic achievement may initiate a paradigm shift in how we view our bodies.

That’s because any time under 45.25 seconds is good enough to earn a spot in the London Olympics next summer, and the July race qualified 24-year-old Oscar Pistorius to represent the South African track team in the World Championships in Athletics starting Sunday with the 400 meter heats in Daegu, South Korea.

Pistorius will need to run one more time under 45.25 seconds in the first half of 2012 before finally earning his spot in the Olympics, and at this point most observers believe he will make it.

Read the full Article: Why Oscar Pistorius deserves to run – CNN.com

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